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The DNS update specification ([4]) describes a mechanism that enables DNS information to be updated over a network.

To modify an existing DNS Name Server object, click the object's icon in the lower pane of the DNS Service window to display detailed information in the right pane.

They might have changed since these instructions were last updated. The first key in the listing, with the value 257 after the DNSKEY record type, is the one needed.

DNS zone transfer, also sometimes known by the inducing DNS query type AXFR, is a type of DNS transaction.

As documented at these zones: "." (the root), ARPA, IN-ADDR. Ask // your network administrator for the IP address of the responsible // master name server. It is always good idea to read CERT's security advisories and to subscribe to the Free BSD security notifications mailing list to stay up to date with the current Internet and Free BSD security issues.

options ; // If you enable a local name server, do not forget to enter 127.0.0.1 // first in your /etc/so this server will be queried. Name servers that are serving a lot of clients will benefit more from this approach than individual hosts. To use this mechanism, uncomment the entries below, and comment the hint zone above. NET are available for AXFR from these servers on IPv4 and IPv6: dns.icann.org, dns.*/ /* zone "." ; zone "arpa" ; */ /* Serving the following zones locally will prevent any queries for these zones leaving your network and going to the root name servers. INT is Deprecated (RFC 4159) zone "ip6.int" ; // NB: Do not use the IP addresses below, they are faked, and only // serve demonstration/documentation purposes! It can be convenient to become // a slave at least for the zone your own domain is in. // // Before starting to set up a master zone, make sure you fully // understand how DNS and BIND work. If and when the master server dies or is unreachable, the slave name server will have the transferred zone information and will be able to serve it.$TTL 3600 ; 1 hour default TTL Failure to do this might render the service attacks.

However, it can take from a few minutes to 48 hours for DNS records to fully propagate beyond our system and around the internet. entry using the DNS propagation checker but cannot access the website, please wait a bit longer, try clearing your browser cache, or try to access the web address from a different browser or Internet connection, e.g. Please note: Newly registered domain names can take up to 24 hours to resolve.

You can check how propagation of the DNS records is coming along using this tool: Global DNS Propagation Checker Depending on your local Internet Service Provider (ISP) or your browser settings, some DNS records might be cached.

It is one of the many mechanisms available for administrators to replicate DNS databases across a set of DNS servers.

A zone transfer uses the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) for transport, and takes the form of a client–server transaction.

Even with // simple mistakes, you can break connectivity for affected parties, // or cause huge amounts of useless Internet traffic. Greater resilience to any potential root server failure/DDo S On the other hand, this method requires more monitoring than the hints file to be sure that an unexpected failure mode has not incapacitated your server. No spurious traffic will be sent from your network to the roots */ // RFCs 19 (and BCP 32 for localhost) zone "localhost" ; zone "127.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "255.in-addr.arpa" ; // RFC 1912-style zone for IPv6 localhost address zone "0.ip6.arpa" ; // "This" Network (RFCs 19) zone "0.in-addr.arpa" ; // Private Use Networks (RFCs 19) zone "10.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "16.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "17.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "18.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "19.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "20.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "21.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "22.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "23.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "24.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "25.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "26.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "27.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "28.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "29.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "30.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "31.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "168.192.in-addr.arpa" ; // Link-local/APIPA (RFCs 39) zone "254.169.in-addr.arpa" ; // IETF protocol assignments (RFCs 57) zone "0.0.192.in-addr.arpa" ; // TEST-NET-[1-3] for Documentation (RFCs 57) zone "2.0.192.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "1.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "113.0.203.in-addr.arpa" ; // IPv6 Range for Documentation (RFC 3849) zone "8.b.d.0.1.0.0.2.ip6.arpa" ; // Domain Names for Documentation and Testing (BCP 32) zone "test" ; zone "example" ; zone "invalid" ; zone "example.com" ; zone "example.net" ; zone "example.org" ; // Router Benchmark Testing (RFCs 25) zone "18.198.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "19.198.in-addr.arpa" ; // IANA Reserved - Old Class E Space (RFC 5735) zone "240.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "241.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "242.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "243.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "244.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "245.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "246.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "247.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "248.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "249.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "250.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "251.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "252.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "253.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "254.in-addr.arpa" ; // IPv6 Unassigned Addresses (RFC 4291) zone "1.ip6.arpa" ; zone "3.ip6.arpa" ; zone "4.ip6.arpa" ; zone "5.ip6.arpa" ; zone "6.ip6.arpa" ; zone "7.ip6.arpa" ; zone "8.ip6.arpa" ; zone "9.ip6.arpa" ; zone "a.ip6.arpa" ; zone "b.ip6.arpa" ; zone "c.ip6.arpa" ; zone "d.ip6.arpa" ; zone "e.ip6.arpa" ; zone "0.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "1.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "2.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "3.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "4.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "5.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "6.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "7.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "8.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "9.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "a.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "b.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "0.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "1.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "2.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "3.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "4.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "5.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "6.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "7.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; // IPv6 ULA (RFC 4193) zone "c.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "d.f.ip6.arpa" ; // IPv6 Link Local (RFC 4291) zone "8.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "9.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "a.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "b.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; // IPv6 Deprecated Site-Local Addresses (RFC 3879) zone "c.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "d.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "e.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "f.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; // IP6. // // NB: Do not blindly enable the examples below. /* An example dynamic zone key "exampleorgkey" ; zone "example.org" ; */ /* Example of a slave reverse zone zone "1.168.192.in-addr.arpa" ; */In the slave case, the zone information is transferred from the master name server for the particular zone, and saved in the file specified. ( 2006051501 ; Serial 10800 ; Refresh 3600 ; Retry 604800 ; Expire 300 ; Negative Response TTL ) ; DNS Servers IN NS ns1. After these steps are done the old key can be removed from the zone.

// // If you are going to set up an authoritative server, make sure you // understand the hairy details of how DNS works. zone "." ; /* Slaving the following zones from the root name servers has some significant advantages: 1. No spurious traffic will be sent from your network to the roots 3. When changing a key it is best to include the new key into the zone, while still signing with the old one, and then move over to using the new key to sign.

This option can also be used to remotely start and stop the DNS server.