Use radiometric dating in a sentence

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. 1979, 1986 © Harper Collins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012 Cite This Source (rā'dē-ō-mět'rĭk) A method for determining the age of an object based on the concentration of a particular radioactive isotope contained within it.For inorganic materials, such as rocks containing the radioactive isotope rubidium, the amount of the isotope in the object is compared to the amount of the isotope's decay products (in this case strontium).Scientific facts are verified by repeatable careful observation or measurement (by experiments or other means).

When an atom varies in the number of neutrons, the variation is called an isotope. During radioactivity, the unstable isotope breaks down and changes into a different substance.A new, more stable isotope, called the decay or daughter product, takes its place.Sedimentary rocks can be dated using radioactive carbon, but because carbon decays relatively quickly, this only works for rocks younger than about 50 thousand years.So in order to date most older fossils, scientists look for layers of igneous rock or volcanic ash above and below the fossil.Example sentence: One of the early tests of radiometric dating was to estimate the age of the wood from an ancient Egyptian artifact, for which the age was already known from historical documents.

A fact is something that is postulated to have occurred or to be correct.measurement, measuring, mensuration, measure - the act or process of assigning numbers to phenomena according to a rule; "the measurements were carefully done"; "his mental measurings proved remarkably accurate" techniques to precisely measure the age of the eruptions of the Kalkarindji volcanic province where lavas covered an area of more than 2 million square kilometers in the Northern Territory and Western Australia.The universe is full of naturally occurring radioactive elements.The object's approximate age can then be figured out using the known rate of decay of the isotope.For organic materials, the comparison is between the current ratio of a radioactive isotope to a stable isotope of the same element and the known ratio of the two isotopes in living organisms.The usual test for a statement of fact is verifiability—that is, whether it can be demonstrated to correspond to experience.